Bangarang

Photography, social justice, and whatever else I want. Might be NSFW sometimes.

deluxvivens:

Powwow tiny tots. Cuter than a flock of hipsters. More powerful than their appropriation.

Excuse me while I burst into tears

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 

For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.

In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

I know I’ve reblogged about these girls before but damn where was this kinda thing in my history classes.

buttonpoetry:

Thadra Sheridan // “Waiting”

"Maybe I should just supplicate myself before you so you can whip me with your menu."

A hilarious poetry short film. Anyone who’s worked in food service (or isn’t a jerk) will understand.

Omg the gum ball

Sasha, Côte d’Ivoire gonna whoop yo team’s ass

GET IT AFRRRICAAAAAAA ILILILILILILILILILILILILIL

storiesofstruggle:

"I busk to pay for expensive stuff because my parents can’t really afford it so I try to help them out. If my parents need help with something, I help them out but it mostly goes to the bank for university. If I want something for myself, they can’t get it for me because they’re focused more on providing for the house, for the whole family. If I have something to pay for at school and my mum can’t do it, I get money from here."

storiesofstruggle:

"I busk to pay for expensive stuff because my parents can’t really afford it so I try to help them out. If my parents need help with something, I help them out but it mostly goes to the bank for university. If I want something for myself, they can’t get it for me because they’re focused more on providing for the house, for the whole family. If I have something to pay for at school and my mum can’t do it, I get money from here."

jessehimself:

Pennsylvania Judge Sentenced For 28 Years For Selling Kids to the Prison System
Mark Ciavarella Jr, a 61-year old former judge in Pennsylvania, has been sentenced to nearly 30 years in prison for literally selling young juveniles for cash. He was convicted of accepting money in exchange for incarcerating thousands of adults and children into a prison facility owned by a developer who was paying him under the table. The kickbacks amounted to more than $1 million.The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has overturned some 4,000 convictions issued by him between 2003 and 2008, claiming he violated the constitutional rights of the juveniles – including the right to legal counsel and the right to intelligently enter a plea. Some of the juveniles he sentenced were as young as 10-years old.Ciavarella was convicted of 12 counts, including racketeering, money laundering, mail fraud and tax evasion. He was also ordered to repay $1.2 million in restitution.His “kids for cash” program has revealed that corruption is indeed within the prison system, mostly driven by the growth in private prisons seeking profits by any means necessary.
—-
Why might this not be a HUGE national story and his name not household? I’ll give you one guess what color those kids were.

jessehimself:

Pennsylvania Judge Sentenced For 28 Years For Selling Kids to the Prison System

Mark Ciavarella Jr, a 61-year old former judge in Pennsylvania, has been sentenced to nearly 30 years in prison for literally selling young juveniles for cash. He was convicted of accepting money in exchange for incarcerating thousands of adults and children into a prison facility owned by a developer who was paying him under the table. The kickbacks amounted to more than $1 million.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has overturned some 4,000 convictions issued by him between 2003 and 2008, claiming he violated the constitutional rights of the juveniles – including the right to legal counsel and the right to intelligently enter a plea. Some of the juveniles he sentenced were as young as 10-years old.

Ciavarella was convicted of 12 counts, including racketeering, money laundering, mail fraud and tax evasion. He was also ordered to repay $1.2 million in restitution.

His “kids for cash” program has revealed that corruption is indeed within the prison system, mostly driven by the growth in private prisons seeking profits by any means necessary.

—-

Why might this not be a HUGE national story and his name not household? I’ll give you one guess what color those kids were.

medievalpoc:

1800s Week!

Charles Cordier

African Venus

France (1851)

Bronze, 39.5 cm.

The Walters Museum:

Cordier submitted a plaster cast of the bust of an African visitor to Paris to the Salon of 1848, and two years later he again entered it as a bronze (Walters 54.2664). A young African woman served as the model for this companion piece in 1851. Regarded as powerful expressions of nobility and dignity, these sculptures proved to be highly popular: casts were acquired by the Museum of National History in Paris and also by Queen Victoria. The Walters’ pair were cast by the Paris foundry Eck and Durand in 1852. These bronzes were esteemed by 19th-century viewers as expressions of human pride and dignity in the face of grave injustice.

[mod note]

One of the things I love most about this piece is that you get something new from almost every single angle.

Photo credits: galeri.uludagsozluk.com, opacity (flickr), The Walters Museum.

[previous submission on this work]